New Studio in an abandoned department store

I recently moved into a new studio. The building is creepy as fuck. 

Lots of beige, featuring Betty

Lots of beige, featuring Betty

It used to be a Myers, and the floor we're on was abandoned sometime in the mid 90s. Therefore, decor is a pure trip. 

Cavernous spaces with art detritus

Cavernous spaces with art detritus

The building is home to a bunch of artists, carpenters and strange and wonderful folk. Here is one example of a strange one. 

Small mountain of old cinema chairs, featuring Luke

Small mountain of old cinema chairs, featuring Luke

I'm sharing 100 sq meters with 3 other artists. We are set up like a motherfucker. You name it and we can make it. 

The inner sanctum

The inner sanctum

It's also got a pretty epic rooftop. This is going to get painted up. Truth.

Our breakroom

Our breakroom

Many hours and many late nights and early mornings will happen in this place. 

In progress

In progress

Street Art in Mundaring

Recently I had the chance to run some graffiti workshops for kids with disabilities. It was a lot of fun.

A self portrait of the artist. 

A self portrait of the artist. 

The project was organised by Mundaring Arts Center with the aim of engaging people in the community that wouldn't normally be exposed to subcultures such as the world of graffiti.

The rare breast eared mouse. 

The rare breast eared mouse. 

I'd seen these projects before and was always amazed at the can control that kids seem to develop so quickly. However, what's even more impressive is the amount of original ideas generated by folk with a different perspective on life.

Dan Duggan in the midst of slip, slop, slap. 

Dan Duggan in the midst of slip, slop, slap. 

Some people would try to cover up the "mistakes" made by the kids. Attempting to normalise their designs and produce the clean, conventional look of graffiti. Instead of this our attitude was to let them do whatever they wanted. I think this worked, but more importantly so did the kids.

Colour bomb bus stop. 

Colour bomb bus stop. 

That there Maserati

I don't really like fancy cars to be honest. I am lucky enough to have a car but it is not what current convention would call appealing. 

An artists impression of the artists car

An artists impression of the artists car

 It's not because fancy cars are expensive (undoubtedly they are); whatever you choose to spend your money on is fine.

This wheel costs more than my kidneys on the black market. 

This wheel costs more than my kidneys on the black market. 

It's not because I don't like the design; I appreciate the effort that has gone into making such a thing. The amount of hours refining concepts and testing ideas is impressive to say the least.

It took 8 hours to draw Ricks head.

It took 8 hours to draw Ricks head.

It's not even because we are expected to believe that a car like a Maserati confers some sort of magical super power on the owner; if you want to think that driving a flashy car makes you good then so be it. 

It is so fast. You will literally go really fast. 

It is so fast. You will literally go really fast. 

My friends. I don't like Fancy cars because they are very difficult to paint on. 

The initial concept involved a crayon and a multitude of tiny dicks

The initial concept involved a crayon and a multitude of tiny dicks

Preparing for Goods

I'm in the finishing stages of preparing my second solo exhibition.

The show is called Goods and will be on display for three months in the laneway between St Michael’s Restaurant and Orno Interiors, near 483 Beaufort Street, Highgate.

Here are a few images of production

I'll post some install shots next week.